Home Forums For Researchers Stem Cell Stem Cell Therapy, From Breakthrough Discovery to Clinical Reality

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    Daniel Gu
    Participant

    In 2016, a Stanford team had a breakthrough discovery. Stroke can be fully cured.

    This is the TV news report on this amazing break through:NPR Interview with the Stanford Stem Cell Team

    We also found this very interesting Facebook Live recording which includes Sonia, the miracle patient in the Stem Cell trial and Dr Steinberg:

    Additional Testimonies:

    There are other successful reports about remarkable results using similar approaches. This is a s testimony as recorded in one of our podcasts:

    A Remarkable Trial, Testimony by Sharon

    We even interviewed the CEO of the company who was developing a stem cell based therapy:

    Athersys CEO Interview

    Fraud in Stem Cell treatment

    This is a Sobering report on stem cell fraud

    Frank Plemons, In Search of A Stem Cell Solution

    Young Stroke Media Report

    In 2019, Young Stroke Media with the assistance of Strokefocus published this interview, in which Amy Edmunds interview some leading Australian Researchers:

    Young Stroke Media Interview with Stem Cell and Genetics Researchers

    It has been more than 4 years since Stanford made the breakthrough discovery. Yet, it seems that the early excitement is quieting down the very promising outlook of the initial finding.

    Share your thoughts. What do you think about the stem cell therapy? Will there ever be a day when healing stroke or Traumatic Brain Injury is just like healing a bone fracture?

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    • Daniel Gu
      Participant

      Those stories and findings are great news. The two most important procedures are: to remove the clot(s) and to get oxygen into those cells before they die. Brain cells don’t regenerate.

      It is far more promising than removing the clots.
      The Stanford clinical trial is significant in that it has found the brain circuits presumed dead after stroke are actually dormant. They can be revived with external intervention. In another word, one day, a medical procedure will be developed to fully restore stroke survivors to full function. Generations later, healing a stroke survivor may not be that much different from healing someone who fractured his feet.
      The question is when that day will come.
      Injection of adult stem cells can revive the dormant circuits, as they release growth factors (a form of protein) which greatly reduce the inflammation of the brain. As the inflammation subdued, neuroplasticity is kicked to high gear. A start up named Athersys found something similar and is working to turn their finding into commercial application.
      Current medical research process poses a challenge. Because of the very stringent regulation, legitimate stem cell treatment is hard to get. The Stanford trial will take up to 1000 survivors in the 3rd round of the clinical trial. This is really a drop in the bucket, taking into consideration that in the US alone, there are 800,000 new stroke survivors each year.
      Many survivors are asking if they could get similar treatments by paying the experiment cost themselves.The answer is no. As a result, they fly to Thailand, Nicaragua and Yugoslavia where there is almost no regulation on stem cell treatment, making themselves an easy target for fraud.
      The question is why not opening up the process, so medical schools like WashU, John Hopkins, Duke, UT Dallas etc can offer something similar to Stanford. If people can find way to pay for it, why push them overseas? With more people getting into clinical trials, it can only accelerate the day when stroke can be fully healed.

       

      • This reply was modified 50 years ago by .
    • Joyce Hoffman
      Moderator

      Those stories and findings are great news. The two most important procedures are: to remove the clot(s) and to get oxygen into those cells before they die. Brain cells don’t regenerate.

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